Food and drink

Sample Roman cuisine in all its forms at the Roman Festival. From roasts, Parthian chicken and Lucanian sausages made especially for the Roman festival to berry wine, mulsum (a type of mead) and Roman stews and moretum (garlic and herb cheese spread) – there's something for everyone!

Our knowledge of Roman cuisine stems from recipes and lists of ingredients that have been handed down and from burnt food remains, paintings and mosaics. It was characterised by daring combinations and elements of surprise! But one thing's for sure – the Romans were true gourmets.

Hot dogs, risotto or Flammkuchen are also available for those who prefer something more modern.

Our offer

TABERNA PISCARIA – A3

  • Smoked fish

TABERNA DOLIUM TITUBANS – F6

  • Roman beverages
  • Roman hors d'oeuvre

CIBARIA – F27

  • Roman breads
  • Sweet pastries
  • Moretum slices
  • Moretum sandwich with schnitzel
  • Olive rolls au gratin
  • Roman hors d'oeuvre

PORCELLUS – F28

  • Roman sausages and gladiator sausages
  • Vegetarian flatbreads
  • Hotdogs

GALLUOLI STELLARUM – F40

  • Hotdogs
  • French fries
  • Chicken Nuggets
  • Burger
  • Tarte flambée
  • Roman lentil stew
  • Chicken skewers with roman pine sauce

EVENTUS GLACIES – F41

  • Soft ice cream
  • Frozen yogurt

LAGANA FRUMENTI VEL FAGOPYRI – F42

  • Sweet and salty Crêpes

LUCI – T4

  • Grilled sausages
  • Porchetta (roman roast pork)
  • Hotdogs
  • French fries
  • Spring rolls
  • Sandwiches
  • Salads
  • Cakes and fruit salad

LUCULLUS – T5

  • Roman sausages
  • Roman roast
  • Chicken
  • Mushroom risotto
  • Salad plate with olive bread

Explanations

Roman sausages
Pork meat was mixed with herbs and spices and smoked. The so-called Lucan sausages are said to have been originally brought to Rome from southern Italy by Roman soldiers. Enjoy the sausages made especially for the Roman Festival in the tent on the Forum.

Moretum
This is a type of pesto dip made from sheep's cheese. Other ingredients include spices, celery, garlic or nuts. Tastes best with freshly baked bread. The cheese paste gets its name from the grating bowl in which it was made: the mortarium.